• +61 401 128 334
  • philcarrero@gmail.com

Yelena Isinbayeva with spikes.

Yelena Isinbayeva with spikes.

pd01357cm x 62cm. Graphite and Charcoal drawing on 350gsm,  watercolour paper rough. Phillip Carrero
Exclusive Prints on Canvas For Sale here!

Autographed by Yelena at the IAAF Golden Gala meet, London 2007.

Yelena Gadzhievna Isinbayeva is a Russian pole vaulter. She is a two-time Olympic gold medalist, a three-time World Champion, the current world record holder in the event, who is widely considered the greatest female pole-vaulter of all time.

Yelena Isinbayeva is all smiles after taking the gold at the recent IAAF World Championships in Moscow 2013

– “Nobody can beat me, nobody, so sorry for this,” Isinbayeva giggled.”The other girls, they need to jump higher to even come close, but I don’t think it will. Right now, it is impossible. No chance.” –

I took this photo before the the Crystal Palace championships in London 2007. My friend Alan Launder took two drawings of Yelena to the competition and got an autograph on each. Yelena gave them back to Alan so we could raise more to buy poles with. As it happened, this drawing is on exhibition at the Sydney Olympic Athletics Centre and bares her original signature. The other sold at a fund raising dinner to a pole vaulter I was coaching at the time.

Phillip

Currans Hill artist Phil Carrero started as an impressionable 16 year old drawing charcoal portraits through the streets of Buenos Aires. He worked his way up from drawing to painting and begun to sell his works around that time. Coming to Australia in 1973 , at the age of 23, Mr Carrero continued his studies in Art and completed an apprenticeship for four months to get himself better acquainted with portraiture painting. Meanwhile, for almost ten years produced and sold many ship portraits and marine paintings. -After that I begun getting around 12 commissions a year for just portraits. That's the point when he begun to make a living out of painting-, he said. He paints in the Traditional, Realistic style ... English and Italian schools, his portraits can resemble the Grand Manner style of the 19th and 20th centuries in England and later, America. (extracted from "Artist has brush with thieves", Macarthur Advertiser, January 2004)