• +61 401 128 334
  • philcarrero@gmail.com

Raising The Flag At Iwo Jima

Raising The Flag At Iwo Jima

JRIwoJima2

132cm x 112cm. Oil on primed board.

Based on Joe Rosenthal’s b/w photo. Phillip Carrero.

 

Raising the Flag at Iwo Jima is painted from a historic photograph taken on February 23, 1945, by Joe Rosenthal. It depicts five United States Marines and a United States Navy corpsman raising an American flag atop Mount Suribachi during the Battle of Iwo Jima in World War II.

 

It won the Pulitzer Prize for Photography the same year it was published (the only photograph at the time ever to have done so), and even appeared on a commemorative US dollar in 1945. What few people know is that this inspiring moment was actually a second version of the original event.

On 23 February 1945, 2nd Battalion Commander Chandler Johnson was ordered to send a platoon to take the Japanese mountain of Suribachi. First Lieutenant Harold G Schrier was chosen to lead the platoon, and as they embarked, Johnson handed Schrier a small US  flag which had been taken from the USS Missoula, and said, ‘If you get to the top, put it up.’ The Battle of Iwo Jima had seen some of the  fiercest  fighting of the Pacific Campaign, and this was the  final throe.

(exerpted from May 12, 2011 By George Clode)

Phillip

Currans Hill artist Phil Carrero started as an impressionable 16 year old drawing charcoal portraits through the streets of Buenos Aires. He worked his way up from drawing to painting and begun to sell his works around that time. Coming to Australia in 1973 , at the age of 23, Mr Carrero continued his studies in Art and completed an apprenticeship for four months to get himself better acquainted with portraiture painting. Meanwhile, for almost ten years produced and sold many ship portraits and marine paintings. -After that I begun getting around 12 commissions a year for just portraits. That's the point when he begun to make a living out of painting-, he said. He paints in the Traditional, Realistic style ... English and Italian schools, his portraits can resemble the Grand Manner style of the 19th and 20th centuries in England and later, America. (extracted from "Artist has brush with thieves", Macarthur Advertiser, January 2004)